Celine Dion Ends Her Las Vegas Reign With $681 Million In Tickets Sold

According to a report from The Hollywood Reporter, Celine Dion’s two residencies came to an end last weekend, and both of them, combined, sold approximately 4,555,752 tickets, reported first by the Billboard Boxscore.

When Celine Dion, John Meglen, and her husband, René Angélil, first announced they were going to have a residency in Las Vegas back in 2003, most of the entertainment industry were shocked, because around that time, residences were considered as a place where performers go to retire.

However, that has changed, and industry insiders claim much of this change has to do with Celine Dion and her massively successful residencies of the last sixteen years. Meglen said to Billboard in February that Las Vegas was the place where you went as your career fell down towards retirement, but Celine changed that.

Thus far, Celine Dion’s residency at Caesar’s Palace on the 8th of June has made approximately $681.3 million, including A New Day, which spanned from 2003 until 2007, and Celine, which started in 2011 and went all the way until this year.

http://bit.ly/2XFNfNI

Over the last sixteen years, Celine Dion sold 4,555,752 tickets. They are the highest-grossing and best-selling residencies in Sin City ever. As it was previously reported, outlets such as The Daily Beast reported that many in the Las Vegas entertainment industry are wildly appreciative of Celine Dion, who has, essentially, spawned a marketplace revolution in the city.

Now, other stars who are on the up-and-up in their career, including Zedd and Calvin Harris have their own residencies in the city, ending years of stigma surrounding residencies in the gambling capital of the United States of America.

Celine’s success in music has been overwhelming, accruing three number one albums on the Billboard 200 as well as four number one Hot 100 singles. She won the album of the year award in 1997 and also was named the number 5 artist of the 1990s.

Despite the fact her musical output declined in the 2000s, her live performances boomed: case-in-point, her aforementioned residencies.



Post a Comment